It’s a Money Thing: 3 Things to Keep After Losing Your Job

Losing your job is stressful. Even with an emergency fund in place, it doesn’t take very long to feel the financial impact of a sudden loss of income. When recovering from income loss, the focus instantly shifts to finding a new job. Although the job hunt is an important part of overcoming a financial setback, it fails to address some of the less obvious consequences of losing your job.

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Making the Most of Multigenerational Living

Back in the good old days, it was common for several generations to live under one roof. In recent years, multigenerational living has made a big comeback, and with it more innovative housing choices. In fact, one in five American households are comprised of adults from different generations such as parents and their adult children, or grandparents, parents and children, according to census data.

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10 Money Moves to Make in Your 60s

Entering your 60s could mean you’re getting ready to reap your financial harvest. But, after decades of careful spending and saving, you may still be hesitant to say goodbye to full-time employment. If you’re still carrying high-interest rate debt, making a hefty mortgage payment, or wondering if you have enough money in savings, delaying retirement might be a good idea. Before you exit the workforce, reassess your finances and be prepared to reboot your retirement plan, as needed.

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10 Money Moves to Make in Your 40s

When you reach your 40s, most likely your responsibilities have increased significantly. With that in mind, it’s more important than ever to figure out how to allocate your hard-earned dollars. To manage day-to-day expenses and accomplish your longer-term financial goals, you’ll need a plan you can live with and adjust it to your changing needs.

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Should My Spouse and I File Taxes Jointly or Separately?

Whether it’s something as simple as picking a restaurant or as complex as deciding whether to have children, marriage requires lots of mutual decision-making.

Financial advice

Couples who tie the knot will have another choice to add to that growing list next tax season, as they can either file joint or separate returns. This choice can affect the amount of taxes they owe or the size of their refunds.

Here’s a closer look at these two options and how to determine which filing status is best for you and your spouse.

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